November Ballot: Local Bond 4A & State Funding Initiative Amendment 73

LPS to put $298 million bond question before voters this November

LPS Board of Education approves Long Range Planning Committee’s recommendation to place a $298M bond on local November ballot; Every school to benefit, will begin replacing aging schools with new construction

At its regularly scheduled August 23, 2018 meeting, the Littleton Public Schools Board of Education, in a 5-0 vote, approved the Long Range Planning Committee’s recommendation to begin to replace the district's aged facilities with new ones, to renovate the newly acquired facility across the street from Littleton High School (formerly Schomp Automotive) with a new district Career and Technical Education and Innovation Center and to make important safety, security and instructional space changes to all other schools. The Board also approved language for the November 2018 ballot, Issue 4A, which will ask local voters to pass a $298 million bond to fund the Long Range Planning Committee’s recommendation.

Read the full news release.

Carrying on this community's legacy for generations to come

Littleton Public Schools is at a crucial point in its history: the legacy left by past generations has been well cared for, but with current funding levels it is aging beyond the district’s ability to maintain the level of excellence LPS students and community members expect and deserve. The Long Range Planning Committee recognizes the district will need to replace a school every three years to maintain an average age of 62 years moving forward. Also, instructional delivery methods are changing, becoming more hands-on, flexible, self-driven and diverse. Modern, inclusive instruction requires spaces that are designed to meet students’ diverse learning needs.

(From LRPC report to BOE Aug. 2018)

Long Range Planning Committee

Highlights from the work of the Long Range Planning Committee:

  • Today’s most efficient and effective elementary schools with the best programming for students serve about 600 students.

  • LPS needs to have the ability to replace failing structures when they are no longer structurally sound, cannot be made accessible to people with disabilities and do not meet the requirements for today’s learning environment.

  • LPS needs to make a strategic first step to maintain quality education that makes future steps clear. LRPC members noted that in 10 years, a future citizens committee could build upon this recommendation and identify the next schools to be replaced with new buildings, based on this work and what makes sense for the community at that time.


Goals of the Long Range Planning Committee

Build new elementary schools with space for 5 classrooms at every grade level:

  • Enroll 4 classes at each grade level

  • Remaining space for support programs and staff

  • Improve operational and instructional efficiency  

Address/reduce traffic and boundary challenges. (A districtwide boundary analysis follows passage of bond.)

Build new schools on campuses that can accommodate the new construction while school is in session in order to mitigate transportation and overcrowding in other elementary schools.

Bond Projects Benefit Every School, Begin Replacing Aging Schools with New Construction

Build a new middle school for the Newton Middle School community on the current Newton campus

  • New, two-story middle school would be built on the Newton campus while school is in session at Newton

  • Replaces the failing structure and solves ADA issues

  • Provides the appropriate space for small and large group instruction, creativity and innovation

  • Includes space for NOVA program, which serves students grades kindergarten through 12 with emotional disabilities

  • Includes space for professional development

  • Includes a Junior Stadium for district use, which provides additional playable surfaces for students in both district-sponsored junior varsity and varsity sports as well as club sports in the community. (It is impossible to schedule all appropriate events at the current LPS Stadium due to overwhelming demand.)

  • Includes new playing fields and parking to serve the school, the neighborhood and the Junior Stadium.

  • Moves the school to a different location on the current campus, away from the busy intersection of Arapahoe Rd. and Colorado, which provides safer student drop-off and pick-up locations for parents and buses

Current:Newton Existing Architectural Drawing Phase II:Newton Phase 2 Architectural Drawing Phase III: Newton Phase 3 Architectural Drawing Phase IV:Newton Phase 4 Architectural Drawing

Click through the above sample architectural drawings 


Build a new elementary school in southeast corner of the district on the current Ames Facility campus

  • Provides a neighborhood school in the southeast corner where many young families are buying homes and where current students must be bussed out of their neighborhood to other LPS elementary schools

  • Naturally solves some of the district’s attendance boundary and transportation issues

  • Provides the appropriate space for small and large group instruction, creativity and innovation

  • Includes a wing for expanded preschool

  • Includes new playgrounds, playing fields and parking to serve the neighborhood


Build a new elementary school to serve the Highland and Franklin communities on the current Franklin campus

  • New, two-story elementary school would be built while school is in session at Franklin

  • Provides the appropriate space for small and large group instruction, creativity and innovation

  • Many students who are currently bussed to Highland and Franklin from the southeast corner of the district would attend the new school in their own neighborhood. The new school serving the Highland and Franklin communities would be the preferred size, providing more opportunities for programming and flexibility

  • Current Franklin Elementary School replaced with playgrounds, playing fields and parking to serve the new elementary school and its community

  • Current Highland Elementary School available to serve LPS in multiple ways. Possibilities include, but are not limited to, an early childhood education center, career-technical education offerings and Meals on Wheels, all of which are currently located in the Ames Facility. Highland may also be available as a "transition" location while other schools are replaced in the future.

Current: Phase II: Phase III:

Click through the above sample architectural drawings 


Renovate a recently purchased property (formerly Schomp Automotive, across from Littleton High School) to create a new Career and Technical Education and Innovation Center for the district

  • Will provide college-level courses and career-focused learning for more students.
  • Will engage and support more non-traditional learners as they prepare for highly skilled careers in a rapidly changing job market.
  • Programs might include (but are not limited to): automotive, aviation, computer coding, construction, drones and robotics technology, electrical, healthcare, plumbing, welding and fabrication. CTE programs such as these would use the same technology as is used in these industries today.
  • The central location is ideal for students from Littleton, Heritage, Arapahoe and Options to access throughout the school day.

Replace old, outdated student desks and classroom furniture in every school with new furnishings that will facilitate modern instruction while accommodating students with a variety of needs

  • Some furniture in our schools is as old as the schools are (1960s and 1970s) and is well beyond its useful life.

  • Provides new, dynamic and inclusive furniture that will facilitate modern instruction while accommodating students with a variety of needs (will be ADA compliant.)

  • Every LPS student and staff member in every LPS school will benefit from furniture replacement.


Maintain district facilities, including charter schools, according to need

  • Addresses the backlog of projects that are not considered critical health and safety priorities but are still important as we continue to prolong the life of our aging facilities until the district can replace them (10-20 years.)

  • Bring schools into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) where possible.

  • Artificial turf

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation and air conditioning

  • Irrigation, xeriscape and artificial turf

  • Kitchens

  • Asphalt and concrete

  • Play equipment

  • Security

  • Lighting

  • Technology infrastructure


The recommendation not only provides for new schools to serve district students and the community with brand new, efficient facilities, but it also alleviates some of the issues the district is faced with in terms of attendance boundaries and transportation efficiencies.

How The Money Will Be Spent

Q&A

Didn’t we just approve a $80 million bond for our schools a few years ago? 
Thanks to local voters, the LPS community passed an $80 million bond in 2013, which did not raise taxes but rather extended the current tax rate at that time. The $80 million was used to maintain and repair the district’s aging facilities and to improve safety and security.

Why is this bond for so much more?
Unlike the previous bond election, which was passed to address critical student safety and structural needs without increasing the tax rate, this bond includes the construction of three brand new schools serving four attendance areas as well as new student and classroom furniture for every school and important maintenance for all other schools. For the first time since 1981, new schools will be constructed. In addition, it is important to continue to maintain all of the other schools until it is possible to also replace them.

Why do we need to pass a bond now?
District facilities are an average age of 58 years and are reaching their end of life. LPS paid an outside firm to conduct a study on compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. This study, which was presented to the Long Range Planning Committee last year, shows noncompliance districtwide. Many other school districts in the Denver metro area and across the country regularly replace schools to keep up with the changing needs of its students and the communities they serve. LPS has never replaced a school, as the district has carefully maintained them over the decades. (While the remodel of Runyon Elementary was extensive, it was not a complete replacement.) However, most schools are no longer conducive to today’s learning environment, will never meet ADA requirements and cannot be remodeled further in order to meet the community’s expectations for safety and security.

Why were these schools chosen to be replaced first?
The Long Range Planning Committee stressed that its recommendation was a logical first step to maintain the quality education the LPS community expects and deserves for its children. Because new schools can be built on the Newton and Franklin campuses while school is in session, this is a logical place to start. Additionally, opening an elementary school on the Ames campus provides natural solutions to some transportation challenges while providing “right sized” schools for the Ames and Highland/Franklin neighborhoods. After Highland students and staff move into their new school, the current Highland Elementary School will be available as a transition location when other schools are rebuilt in the years to come. The Long Range Planning Committee stressed that all LPS schools must be replaced with new schools eventually because they are reaching their end of life. In fact, LPS must replace a school every three years to keep the average age of its facilities at 62 years.

Will my taxes be affected?
LPS serves portions of Littleton, Centennial, Columbine Valley, Bow Mar, Greenwood Village and Englewood. If part of your property taxes go toward Littleton Public Schools, that portion of your taxes will increase. If not, then the LPS bond will not affect your property taxes.

How much will my taxes go up if this passes?
Passage of a $298M bond in LPS would cost homeowners $29-$49 annually for every $100,000 of residential actual value. For example, a home with residential actual value of $400,000 would see a property tax increase of $116-$196 annually.

Why aren’t our schools in compliance with The Americans with Disabilities Act?
The ADA was enacted in 1990, almost a decade after LPS’ newest school was built. LPS has done its best to stay in compliance where it is possible. But, because our schools were built before the ADA was enacted, some simply cannot be renovated to be ADA compliant.

How will the bond money be spent?
The largest projects include the Career and Technical Education Center, two new elementary schools, a new middle school and new furniture for all schools. The rest of the projects include improvements to safety, security, technology infrastructure, lighting, kitchens, junior stadium, HVAC and playgrounds and fields across the district according to need.

Can’t you use marijuana tax money instead of raising property taxes?
It is a misperception that most of the marijuana tax revenue goes to K-12 education. The majority of funds go to the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund for healthcare, health education, substance abuse and treatment programs and law enforcement. Through a Colorado Department of Education Health Professional Grant, LPS gets enough money to fund two positions, and these grant funds are limited to three years. Click here to view a marijuana tax distribution chart.

How is it possible to have school while another school is being built on the same campus?
This is the way many school replacements are done across the nation. Prior to any mobilization and construction activities, a comprehensive safety plan must be created that addresses all safety issues. This would be developed through a collaborative effort by the contractor with the district’s operations, maintenance and construction staff; the program manager; and the school’s appointed staff.

Do we need another stadium?
Yes. The number of sports and activities for boys and girls, both school sponsored and in the community, has outgrown the district’s capacity and puts LPS at risk of being in violation of Title IX laws. The LPS Stadium is currently shared by all three high schools and is used by Littleton High School for PE class and band, as well as numerous youth sports leagues in the community. The constant, year-round wear and tear of the track and field at the LPS Stadium makes it nearly impossible to maintain for student safety. A new junior stadium on the Newton campus would provide an additional lighted field and track with spectator seating for both school and community sports teams to use.

What will the newly acquired Schomp Automotive property across the street from Littleton High School be used for?
The LPS Board of Education purchased this property to be renovated and turned into a new Career and Technical Education and Innovation Center. Here, students will have greater access to programs that better prepare them for life after high school. It would offer valuable, hands-on learning experiences for students who plan to enter the workforce after graduation; enable more students to get on the path to earning an industry certification or two-year associate’s degree; and better prepare students who plan to pursue undergraduate and advanced degrees in a CTE field. In many cases, this programming would facilitate pathways that could help to reduce the cost of a traditional four-year college education for students and their families. Programs could include, but are not limited to: automotive, aviation, computer coding, construction, drones and robotics technology, electrical, healthcare, plumbing, welding and fabrication. CTE programs such as these would use the same technology as is used in these industries today. The central location is ideal for students from Littleton, Heritage, Arapahoe and Options to access throughout the school day. Programming for middle school and elementary school students may also be available.

How will LPS ensure that the bond money is being spent according to the plan?
As in previous local elections, the LPS Board of Education will appoint an oversight committee of residents to oversee the expenditure of bond funds throughout the process.  This committee will report back to the Board of Education periodically, and the report will also be included in the district's independent audit report and published on the district website.

What is the difference between the statewide ballot initiative (Amendment 73) and the LPS bond initiative?
The LPS bond initiative is a property tax increase that will be decided by local voters. It will raise $298 million for capital projects, such as the construction of new schools, the continued repair and upkeep of others, the renovation of the former Schomp Automotove property into a Career and Technical Education and Innovation Center and new furniture across the district. Amendment 73 is a statewide income tax affecting the top 8% of income earners in Colorado. It will raise $1.6 billion annually for K-12 education statewide, bringinig Colorado closer to the national average in school funding. LPS' share of those funds is $23.1 million annually. Funds will be spent on recurring needs such as additional staff in schools to better meet the safety, academic and mental health needs of students; new programming and additional staff for the Career and Technical Education Center; and free full-day kindergarten districtwide. In LPS, both initiatives work together to provide funding that will address student needs. LPS taxpayers will have the opportunity to vote on both initiatives.

Resolution & Ballot Language for November 6, 2018 local election

ARAPAHOE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6

RESOLUTION CALLING AN ELECTION ON NOVEMBER 6, 2018, TO AUTHORIZE THE INCURRENCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION INDEBTEDNESS BY THE DISTRICT AND AUTHORIZE THE LEVY OF AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAXES TO PAY FOR SUCH GENERAL OBLIGATION INDEBTEDNESS; AND SETTING THE BALLOT TITLE AND BALLOT QUESTION FOR THE FOREGOING.

WHEREAS, the Arapahoe County School District No. 6 (the “District”), in the County of Arapahoe and the State of Colorado, is a public corporation duly organized and existing under the Constitution and the laws of the State of Colorado; and

WHEREAS, the members of the Board of Education of the District (the “Board”) have been duly elected, chosen and qualified; and

WHEREAS, Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution (“TABOR”) requires voter approval for any new tax, the creation of any debt and for spending certain moneys above limits established by TABOR; and

WHEREAS, the Board has determined the interest of the District and the public interest and necessity demand and require enlarging, improving, remodeling, repairing, or making additions to any school building, constructing or erecting school buildings, equipping or furnishing any school building, improving school grounds, as described in the ballot question set forth in Section 4 hereof, all at a cost estimated at approximately $298,870,000 (the “Project”); and

WHEREAS, TABOR requires the District to submit ballot issues (as defined in TABOR) to the District’s electors on limited election days before action can be taken on such ballot issues; and

WHEREAS, November 6, 2018, is one of the election dates at which ballot issues may be submitted to the eligible electors of the District pursuant to TABOR; and

WHEREAS, the County Clerk and Recorder in Arapahoe County (the “County Clerk”) will conduct the election on November 6, 2018 as a coordinated election (the “election”); and

WHEREAS, it is necessary to submit to the eligible electors of the District, at the election, the proposition of creating general obligation indebtedness in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $298,870,000 to finance the Project and increasing taxes to pay such debt; and

WHEREAS, the District will not have held more than one other election on the question of contracting a bonded indebtedness for any purpose within the twelve months immediately preceding the election herein called.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF ARAPAHOE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6, IN THE COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE AND STATE OF COLORADO:

  • Section 1. All action heretofore taken (not inconsistent with the provisions of this resolution) by the District and the officers thereof, directed towards the election and the objects and purposes herein stated and the questions set forth herein are, ratified, approved and confirmed. Unless otherwise defined herein, all terms used herein shall have the meanings specified in Section 22-42-101, C.R.S. or Section 1-1-104, C.R.S.
  • Section 2. Pursuant to TABOR, Title 22, C.R.S. and the Uniform Election Code of 1992, and all laws amendatory thereof and supplemental thereto, the District hereby determines that an election shall be held on November 6, 2018 (the “election”), and that there shall be submitted to the eligible electors of the District the question set forth herein. Because the election will be held as part of the coordinated election, the Board hereby determines that the County Clerk whall conduct the election on behalf of the District. The officers of the District are hereby authorized to enter into one or more intergovernmental agreements with the County Clerk pursuant to section 1-7-116, C.R.S. Any such intergovernmental agreement heretofore entered into in connection with the election is hereby ratified, approved and confirmed.
  • Section 3. The total aggregate principal amount of the indebtedness to be incurred from time to time for the portion of the Project to be acquired pursuant to this resolution shall not exceed the sum of $298,870,000.
  • Section 4. The Board hereby authorizes and directs the officers of the District to certify on or before September 7, 2018, the following question in substantially the form hereinafter set forth to the County Clerk. Such question shall be submitted to the eligible electors of the District at the election:

BOND QUESTION:

SHALL ARAPAHOE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6 (LITTLETON PUBLIC SCHOOLS) DEBT BE INCREASED $298,870,000 WITH A REPAYMENT COST OF UP TO $584,690,150, AND SHALL DISTRICT TAXES BE INCREASED UP TO $29,992,100 ANNUALLY FOR PROVIDING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS OF THE DISTRICT, WHICH MAY INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

1. IMPROVING SAFETY AND SECURITY AT SCHOOL BUILDINGS, INCLUDING UPGRADING SCHOOL SAFETY EQUIPMENT;

2. PROVIDING A CAREER, TECHNICAL, AND INNOVATION CENTER, IN ORDER TO PROVIDE COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES AND CAREER-FOCUSED LEARNING FOR MORE STUDENTS;

3. EQUIPPING AND/OR FURNISHING SCHOOL BUILDINGS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM) EQUIPMENT;

4. REPAIRING, RENOVATING, EQUIPPING, OR RE-CONSTRUCTING AGED SCHOOL BUILDINGS TO BE SAFER, MORE EFFICIENT, AND ACCESSIBLE TO ALL STUDENTS, INCLUDING THOSE WITH PHYSICAL DISABILITIES, AND TO PROVIDE A CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT NECESSARY TO TEACH THE SKILLS FOR COLLEGE, MILITARY SERVICE, AND CAREERS OF THE FUTURE; AND

PROVIDED THAT THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND PROCEEDS WILL BE MONITORED BY A BOARD OF EDUCATION APPOINTED OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE OF RESIDENTS, AND SUCH EXPENDITURES WILL BE REPORTED IN THE DISTRICT’S INDEPENDENT AUDIT PUBLISHED ON THE DISTRICT’S WEB SITE;

AND SHALL THE MILL LEVY BE INCREASED IN ANY YEAR WITHOUT LIMITATION AS TO RATE AND AMOUNT SUFFICIENT TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL OF, PREMIUM, IF ANY, AND INTEREST ON SUCH DEBT OR ANY REFUNDING DEBT (OR TO CREATE A RESERVE FOR SUCH PAYMENT) PROVIDED THAT ANY REVENUE PRODUCED BY SUCH MILL LEVY SHALL NOT EXCEED $29,992,100 ANNUALLY; SHALL SUCH DEBT TO BE EVIDENCED BY THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO BE SOLD IN ONE SERIES OR MORE, FOR A PRICE ABOVE OR BELOW THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF SUCH SERIES, ON TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND WITH SUCH MATURITIES AS PERMITTED BY LAW, INCLUDING PROVISIONS FOR REDEMPTION OF THE BONDS PRIOR TO MATURITY WITH OR WITHOUT PAYMENT OF THE PREMIUM OF NOT TO EXCEED THREE PERCENT; AND SHALL THE DISTRICT’S DEBT LIMIT BE INCREASED -4- FROM AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO 20% OF THE DISTRICT’S ASSESSED VALUE TO AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO 6% OF THE DISTRICT’S ACTUAL VALUE, AS CERTIFIED BY THE ARAPAHOE COUNTY ASSESSOR; AND SHALL SUCH TAX REVENUES AND THE EARNINGS FROM THE INVESTMENT OF SUCH BOND PROCEEDS AND TAX REVENUES BE COLLECTED, RETAINED AND SPENT AS A VOTER APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION OR ANY OTHER LAW?


  • Section 5. Diane Doney is hereby appointed as the designated election official of the District for purposes of performing acts required or permitted by law in connection with the election.
  • Section 6. If a majority of the votes cast on the question to authorize general obligation indebtedness and the levy of ad valorem property taxes submitted at the election shall be in favor of incurring general obligation indebtedness and levying ad valorem property taxes as provided in such question, the District acting through the Board shall be authorized to proceed with the necessary action to incur general obligation indebtedness and levy ad valorem property taxes in accordance with such question. Any authority to contract general obligation indebtedness or to levy ad valorem property taxes, if conferred by the results of the election, shall be deemed and considered a continuing authority to contract the general obligation indebtedness and levy the ad valorem taxes so authorized at any one time, or from time to time, and neither the partial exercise of the authority so conferred, nor any lapse of time, shall be considered as exhausting or limiting the full authority so conferred.
  • Section 7. If a majority of the votes cast on the question authorize the issuance of bonds as described in the bond question set forth above, the District intends to issue such bonds in the approximate aggregate principal amount of $298,870,000 to pay the costs of the Project, including the reimbursement of certain costs incurred by the District prior to the execution and delivery of such bonds, upon terms acceptable to the District, as authorized in a resolution to be hereafter adopted and to take all further action which is necessary or desirable in connection therewith. The officers, employees and agents of the District shall take all action necessary or reasonably required to carry out, give effect to and consummate the transactions contemplated hereby and shall take all action necessary or desirable to finance the Project and to otherwise carry out the transactions contemplated by the resolution. The District shall not use reimbursed moneys for purposes prohibited by Treasury Regulation §1.150-2(h). This resolution is intended to be a declaration of “official intent” to reimburse expenditures within the meaning of Treasury Regulation §1.150-2.
  • Section 8. Pursuant to Section 1-11-203.5, C.R.S., any election contest arising out of a ballot issue or ballot question election concerning the order of the ballot or the form or content of the ballot title shall be commenced by petition filed with the proper court within five days after the title of the ballot issue or ballot question is set.
  • Section 9. The officers of the District are authorized and directed to take all action necessary or appropriate to effectuate the provisions of this resolution. The President is hereby authorized to execute this Resolution on behalf of the Board. The Secretary is hereby authorized to attest to such execution by the President.
  • Section 10. All orders, bylaws and resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict with this resolution, are hereby repealed.
  • Section 11. If any section, paragraph, clause or provision of this resolution shall for any reason be held to be invalid or unenforceable, the invalidity or unenforceability of such section, paragraph, clause or provision shall not affect any of the remaining provisions of this resolution.

Arguments for Passage of LPS Bond Election:

  • LPS would be able to construct a new, ideally sized and efficient elementary school to serve the Highland and Franklin communities.
  • The recommended bond package enables the construction of new schools without displacing students from their current buildings during the construction process.
  • The bond would make possible a cutting-edge Career and Technical Education (CTE) and Innovation Center to provide advanced, hands-on instruction in various fields.
  • The Long-Range Planning Committee recognizes the need to locate elementary schools where the district's population could benefit, and this is reflected in the recommended bond package.
  • Reopening an elementary school on the Ames campus will provide a neighborhood school for families in the southeast corner of the district while simultaneously solving some of the attendance boundary and transportation issues the district is currently facing.
  • The recommended bond package includes lighted fields at all the district's high schools.
  • Every school will get new, dynamic furniture to facilitate flexible, inclusive and diverse instruction.
  • The bond includes a plan for the construction of a Junior Stadium to expand the district's ability to accommodate the growing number of boys and girls sports at a time when field space in the community is a scarce commodity.
  • There will be the potential for expansion of early childhood education in the district.

Arguments Against Passage of the LPS Bond Election:

  • This will mean a tax increase for the LPS community.

Please join Superintendent Brian Ewert at an upcoming community information night to learn more about the proposed Littleton Public Schools Bond Issue 4A.

For dates and times, visit the LPS Newsroom.

View highlights from Brian Ewert's presentation.

Issues & Challenges

The Long Range Planning Committee examined several strategic factors when creating and evaluating scenarios to address:

  • Transportation

  • Schools with declining enrollment

  • Schools in need of renovation or replacement

  • Adjacent schools/communities facilitating keeping communities together

  • Ability to construct new building on-site while school is in session in current building

The Long Range Planning Committee has worked through several potential bond package scenarios as it seeks to find the solution that best meets the district’s goal: “One hundred percent of LPS students will graduate prepared for meaningful post-secondary opportunities.” The Committee’s goal was to ensure that the recommended bond package scenario will positively impact every student in the district; begin the process of replacing aging facilities with state-of-the-art schools that will serve students and community for future generations; and encouraging efficiencies in programming space, transportation and infrastructure.

One of the major points the committee examined was the ability to construct a new building on site during school. Another major focus was the ability to keep communities together when looking at building a new elementary school.

How Do Flexible Furniture Classrooms Impact Learning in LPS?

What do today's new elementary and middle schools look like?

Here are some examples of newly built elementary and middle schools.

Timeline

January 2019–March 2020
Design and procurement for new middle school on Newton campus, Junior Stadium and new elementary school on the Ames Facility campus

March 2020–June 2021
Procurement and build new middle school on Newton campus, Junior Stadium and new elementary school on the Ames facility campus

June 2020–June 2021
Design and procurement for new elementary school to serve Highland and Franklin communities on the current Franklin campus

Long Range Planning Committee Report to the Board of Education
August 9, 2018

Cost to Local Taxpayers

Passage of a $298 million bond in LPS would cost homeowners $29-$49 annually for every $100,000 of residential actual value. For example, a home with residential actual value of $400,000 would see a property tax increase of $116-$196 annually.

LPS Board passes resolution in support of Amendment 73 - Great Schools Thriving Communities

At the August 23, 2018 meeting, the LPS Board of Education passed a resolution in support of statewide ballot initiative Amendment 73-Great Schools Thriving Communities, which will be on the November 2018 ballot across Colorado. Amendment 73 asks Colorado voters to pass a ballot initiative to raise an additional $1.6 billion annual revenue for Colorado public schools, bringing them closer to the national average in school funding. Passage of Amendment 73 would mean an additional $23.1 million annually in LPS, which would help fund priorities related to early childhood education, adequate school staffing, career and technical education programming, security and mental health supports and additional academic interventions. 


LPS Board of Education Priorities for A73 Funding:

  • adequate and equitable staffing for schools;
  • enhanced safety and security measures;
  • additional career, technical, and innovative programming;
  • mental health supports and initiatives;
  • free full-day kindergarten for all students;
  • opportunities for additional instructional time/days for students;
  • recruitment and retention of highly effective teachers and staff;
  • additional early childhood educational opportunities.

LPS Board of Education Resolution in support of Amendment 73

Learn more about Amendment 73-Great Schools Thriving Communities and how it impacts funding for Littleton Public Schools

Tax Impact Calculator