2019 Archives

Enacted Senate Legislation

Senate Bill 009 - Financial Incentives for Rural Educators. Sponsored by Senator N. Todd and Representatives J. Wilson and B. McLachlan. Under existing law, the department of higher education (department) annually awards up to 40 stipends of not more than $2,800 to students enrolled in teacher preparation programs who agree to teach in a rural school or rural school district. The bill removes the limit on the number of stipends and increases the amount to $4,000. Under existing law, the department also annually awards up to 60 stipends to educators in rural schools and rural school districts who are seeking certain certifications. The bill removes the limit on the number of stipends.

Senate Bill 010 - Professional Behavioral Health Services for Schools. Sponsored by Senator R. Fields and Representatives B. McLachlan and D. Valdez. The bill allows grant money to be used for behavioral health care services at recipient schools and specifies that grants may also fund behavioral health services contracts with community providers. The bill requires the department of education (department) to prioritize grant applications based on the school's need for additional health professionals, and grant applicants must specify the extent to which the school has seen an increase in activities or experiences that affect students' mental wellbeing. The bill allows a community provider to commit money to schools. It also changes the amount the department can expend to offset the costs incurred in implementing the program from 3% to 5% of money appropriated for the program. The bill allows school districts to enter into agreements with specified groups to implement evidence-based, school-wide behavior supports and strategies to build and support positive school climates, including providing behavioral health services and supports; implement strategies to reduce the incidence of suspension and expulsion; and implement alternatives to suspension or expulsion.

Senate Bill 024 - Taxes Paid by Electronic Fund Transfers. Sponsored by Senator J. Tate and Representatives J. Arndt and E. Hooton. The bill authorizes the executive director of the department of revenue (director) to require the remittance of severance taxes electronically and allows the department to promulgate rules governing such electronic payment. The bill authorizes the director to require a taxpayer to remit sales taxes by electronic funds transfer at an earlier hour on the deadline day for making a return and paying the taxes due than taxpayers who remit sales taxes by other means.

Senate Bill 025 - Information to Students Regarding Safe Haven Laws. Sponsored by Senator J. Smallwood and Representative E. Hooton. The bill concerns providing information to public school students regarding laws that provide for the safe abandonment of newborn children.

Senate Bill 039 - Interdistrict Transportation of Students. Sponsored by Senators R. Zenzinger and T. Story and Representative D. Michaelson Jenet. The bill restores the statutory language in section 22-32-113, C.R.S., to the language as it existed before the statute was amended by section 7 of House Bill 18-1306, as enacted during the 2019 legislative session. Section 7 has been declared void by a Colorado court for violating section 21 of article V of the Colorado Constitution that requires bills to contain a single subject clearly expressed in the bill's title. The bill allows a school district to furnish transportation, or to reimburse parents or others for the cost of transportation to and from its schools to students who are residents of another district if the resident school district is adjacent to the school district of attendance and the resident school district consents to the transportation of its students to the adjacent school district.

Senate Bill 049 - Statute of Limitations Failure to Report Child Abuse. Sponsored by Senator R. Fields and Representative D. Michaelson Jenet. The bill makes the statute of limitations 5 years for failure to report child abuse when a child makes a verbal or written allegation of unlawful sexual behavior to a mandatory reporter.

Senate Bill 059 - Automatic Enrollment in Advanced Course Grant Program. Sponsored by Senator D. Moreno and Representative J. Buckner. The bill establishes the automatic enrollment in advanced courses grant program (grant program) in the department of education (department) to provide funding for school districts that automatically enroll certain students in advanced courses. In order to be eligible for the grant program, a school district must automatically enroll students who are in ninth grade or higher in an advanced course in a subject related to on in which the student demonstrated proficiency on the prior year's statewide assessment. Eligible school districts are encouraged to automatically enroll eligible fourth- through eighth-grade students in advanced courses as well. School districts are required to permit parents to remove their children from automatically enrolled classes and may permit parents to exempt their children from any automatic enrollment.

Senate Bill 068 - Expand Disclosure Electioneering Communication. Sponsored by Senators R. Zenzinger and J. Tate and Representatives M. Weissman and L. Cutter. The state constitution defines an electioneering communication to mean certain communication that unambiguously refers to a candidate that is disseminated to the public within 30 days before a primary election or within 60 days before a general election. For purposes of campaign finance disclosure, sections 1, 2, and 3 of the bill expand the definition of this term in the Fair Campaign Practices Act to include any communication that satisfies all other requirements of the definition of the term specified in the state constitution but that is broadcast, printed, mailed, delivered, or distributed between the primary election and the general election. Section 3 also requires any person who expends $1,000 or more per calendar year on electioneering communications or regular biennial school electioneering communications to state in the communication the name of the person making the communication in accordance with existing statutory requirements for communication constituting and independent expenditure.

Senate Bill 069 - Nonpublic School Teacher Development Programs. Sponsored by Senator P. Lundeen and Representatives J. Wilson and B. Buentello. Under existing law, school districts, charter schools, and the state charter school institute are permitted to operate induction programs for teachers, special services providers, principals, and administrators, and alternative licensure programs for teachers and principals who do not hold professional licenses. The bill clarifies that nonpublic schools may operate such programs.

Senate Bill 071 - Child Hearsay Exception. Sponsored by Senator R. Fields and Representative D. Roberts. The bill amends the statutory exception to the hearsay rule to admit an out-of-court statement made by a child if certain conditions are satisfied:

  • Any criminal or delinquency proceeding in which the child (a person under 13 years of age) is alleged to have been a victim; or
  • Any criminal, delinquency, or civil proceeding in which the child describes all or part of an offense of unlawful sexual behavior.

Senate Bill 085 - Equal Pay for Equal Work Act. Sponsored by Senators B. Pettersen and J. Danielson and Representatives J. Buckner and S. Gonzales-Gutierrez. The bill removes the authority of the director of the division of labor standards and statistics in the department of labor and employment (director) to enforce wage discrimination complaints based on an employee's sex and instead permits an aggrieved person to bring a civil action in district court to pursue remedies specified in the bill. The bill allows exceptions to the prohibition against a wage differential based on sex if the employer demonstrates that a wage differential is based upon one ore more factors, including:

  • A seniority system;
  • A merit system; or
  • A system that measures earnings by quantity or quality of production.

The bill prohibits an employer from:

  • Seeing the wage rate history of a prospective employee;
  • Relying on a prior wage rate to determine a wage rate;
  • Discriminating or retaliating against a prospective employee for failing to disclose the employee's wage rate history; and
  • Discharging or retaliating against an employee for actions by an employee asserting the rights established by the bill against the employer.

The bill requires an employer to announce to all employees employment advancement opportunities and job openings and the pay range for the openings. The director is authorized to enforce actions against an employer concerning transparency in pay and employment opportunities, including fines of between $500 and $10,000 per violation.

Senate Bill 094 - Extend School Finance Interim Committee. Sponsored by Senators N. Todd and P. Lundeen and Representative A. Garnett. The bill extends the work of the legislative interim committee on school finance (interim committee) for one year to include the 2019 legislative interim. For the 2019 legislative interim, the bill maintains the party and chamber balance of legislative members on the interim committee and specifies the method for appointing interim committee members. The bill permits the interim committee to determine whether an din which interim to study the issues set forth in statute. The bill authorizes the interim committee to contract with a vendor or vendors to assist with or facilitate the work of the interim committee. The bill authorizes the interim committee to use unexpended money from the 2018-2019 budget year during the 2019-2020 budget year to cover costs incurred by the interim committee, including the hiring of a consultant or facilitator, if applicable.

Senate Bill 097 - Area Technical College Grant Program. Sponsored by Senators D. Coram and T. Story and Representatives J. McCluskie and M. Soper. The bill establishes a grant program to provide money to area technical colleges (ATC) for specified capital construction and equipment purchases. An ATC may submit a request to the Colorado commission on higher education (commission). The commission may include the grant request in its budget request for ATCs in the following state fiscal year. If the ATC receives grant money, the ATC must submit a report back to the commission in any year in which it expends grant money.

Senate Bill 100 - Unauthorized Disclosure of Intimate Images Act. Sponsored by Senator R. Gardner and Representative K. Tipper. The bill creates the Uniform Civil Remedies for Unauthorized Disclosure of Intimate Images Act. An individual whose body is shown in whole or in part in an intimate image and who has suffered harm from a person's intentional disclosure or threatened disclosure of that intimate image without the depicted individual's consent has a cause of action against that person if the person knew:

  • The depicted individual did not consent to the disclosure;
  • The intimate image was private; and
  • The depicted individual was identifiable.

The bill provides an exception to the civil action if the disclosure is made in good faith under various circumstances or if the person disclosing the image is a parent or guardian and has not disclosed the image for purposes of sexual arousal, sexual gratification, humiliation, degradation, or monetary or commercial gain. A successful plaintiff may recover:

  • The greater of:
    • Economic and noneconomic damages proximately caused by the defendant's disclosures or threatened disclosures, including the damages for emotional distress whether or not accompanied by other damages; or
    • Statutory damages not to exceed $10,000 against each defendant found liable for all disclosures or threatened disclosures by the defendant;
  • An amount equal to the gain made by the defendant from disclosure of the intimate image if applicable;
  • Punitive damages;
  • Reasonable attorney fees and costs; and
  • Additional relief, including injunctive relief.

The civil action has a 4-year statute of limitation.

Senate Bill 102 - Innovation School Operating as a Community School. Sponsored by Senator R. Zenzinger and Representative B. Titone. Under existing law, a public school may become an innovation school by submitting an innovation plan to its local school board and having the local school board approve that plan. The bill defines community school and permits a public school to include in its innovation plan that it will operate as a community school.

Senate Bill 128 - School Finance Mid-Year Adjustments. Sponsored by Senators D. Moreno and N. Todd and Representatives D. Esgar and B. McLachlan. The general assembly recognizes that the actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count for the 2018–2019 budget year are lower than anticipated when the appropriation amount was established during the 2018 legislative session. In addition, local property tax and specific ownership tax receipts are more than anticipated, increasing the local share of total program funding. The bill declares the general assembly's intent to reduce state share of total program funding to maintain the budget stabilization factor established during the 2018 legislative session. The bill adjusts the amount of total program funding specified in statute to reflect this intent. The bill makes an appropriation to the department of education to correct errors in the calculation and distribution of at-risk funding to the state charter school institute in 2 previous budget years.

Senate Bill 129 - Regulation of Online Schools. Sponsored by Senator T. Story and Representative M. Froelich. The bill directs the online division in the department of education (department) to collect information twice each school year concerning students who withdraw from enrollment in an online school after the annual count date, which must include whether the student enrolls in another school, completes a high school equivalency examination if they student was enrolled in Grades 11 or 12, or otherwise continues or completes elementary or secondary school during the school year in which the student withdrew. The department must annually summarize the information in a report and submit the report to the state board of education and the education committees of the general assembly. The existing statute requires a school district, group of school districts, board of cooperative services, or the state charter school institute that seeks to authorize a multi-district online school to first obtain certification for the multi-district online school from the department. Under the bill, if an existing multi-district online school changes authorizers, the new authorizer must obtain a new certification of the multi-district online school. Under existing law, an online school is subject to the same accountability requirements as apply to other public schools. The bill states that if an online school is on performance watch and changes authorizers, either in its original form or as a successor school, or if the online school is created as a successor school with the same authorizer, the online school remains on performance watch. If an online school is closed because of actions taken as a result of accountability, the online school must apply for a new certification before it can operate again either as the original online school or as a successor school, regardless of whether the online school changes authorizers.

Senate Bill 138 - Bond Requirements for Public Projects Using Private Financing. Sponsored by Senators K. Priola and F. Winter and Representative S. Bird. Under current law, when a person, company, firm, corporation, or contractor (contractor) enters into a contract with a county, municipality, school district, or, in some instances, any other political subdivision of the state to perform work in connection with a project that has specified characteristics, the contractor is required to execute performance bonds and payment bonds. The bill specifies that these bonding requirements apply to all construction contracts situated or located on public real property using public or private money or public or private financing.

Senate Bill 161 - Sunset Council for Parent Involvement in Education. Sponsored by Senators J. Bridges and T. Story and Representative C. Kipp. The bill implements the recommendations of the department of regulatory agencies' sunset review by continuing the state advisory council for parent involvement indefinitely.

Senate Bill 181 - Protect Public Welfare Oil and Gas Operations. Sponsored by Senators M. Foote and S. Fenberg and Representatives K. Becker and Y. Caraveo. The bill concerns additional public welfare protections regarding the conduct of oil and gas operations.

Senate Bill 183 - Alternate Procedure to Reorganize School Districts. Sponsored by Senators N. Todd and K. Priola and Representatives J. Wilson and D. Michaelson Jenet. The bill creates an alternate process for the dissolution and annexation of a school district. Pursuant to the bill, if a school district meets specified criteria, the board of education of the school district (local school board) may seek dissolution and annexation of the school district by convening an organization planning committee (committee) that consists of representation from the local school board of the dissolving school district and the local school boards of the contiguous school districts. The local school board of the dissolving school district must notify the commissioner of education (commissioner) when a committee is formed. The committee must create a proposed plan of organization (plan) that dissolves the convening school district and annexes the territory of the dissolved school district to one or more of the contiguous school districts. The bill specifies the issues that the committee must consider in creating the plan. After adopting the proposed plan, the committee must submit the proposed plan to the commissioner and the local school board of the affected school districts and provide notice of public hearings on the proposed plan. After holding public hearings, the committee must work with the commissioner to develop and adopt a final plan of organization. Within a set time after the final plan is adopted, the local school board of each affected school district must adopt the final plan by written resolution. If a local school board does not adopt the plan and there are only 2 affected school districts, or if the plan is not approved by at least 2 of the affected school districts, the committee is dissolved. If fewer than all but at least 2 of the affected school districts approve the plan, the committee may continue and prepare a new plan that involves only the school districts of the local school boards that approved the final approved plan. Following approval of a final plan by the local school boards of all of the affected school districts, the county clerk and recorder for each affected county must file a map and legal description of the annexing school districts with the commissioner. The final plan takes effect on the date specified in the plan, and the final plan must be available for public review upon request. If the dissolved district has a certain level of indebtedness that is not bonded indebtedness, an annexing school dissolving, after the effective date of the annexation and subject to voter approval, may levy a temporary tax of a specified amount on the annexed property to retire the indebtedness. The bill clarifies that, if the dissolving school district has bonded indebtedness existing as of the date of the dissolution and annexation and the annexing school district or school districts do not vote to assume the amount of the bonded indebtedness, the bonded indebtedness continues to be paid by the existing levy against the property of the dissolved school district, collected by the annexing school district or school districts.

Senate Bill 190 - Teacher Preparation Program Support. Sponsored by Senators N. Todd and B. Rankin and Representatives J. Wilson and B. McLachlan. The bill allows an institution of higher education (institution) to enter into a fee-for-service contract with the department of higher education (department) for the delivery of an approved educator preparation program or an alternative teacher program (preparation program) as a specialty program if the preparation program meets the requirements specified in the bill, including strong partnerships with school districts, boards of cooperative services that operate public schools, and charter schools (local education providers); a full-year of classroom residency co-teaching alongside a mentor teacher; and financial support for teacher candidates during the year of classroom residency. A partnership may include one or more institutions and one or more local education providers. Through a partnership, the institution and local education providers may identify teaching schools to provide clinical practice opportunities, induction programs for program graduates, professional development for mid-career and veteran teachers, and work exchange opportunities for program faculty and teachers employed by the local education providers. The bill  specifies that the full year of classroom residency must ensure that the teacher candidate is mentored by a highly effective veteran teacher who holds a master certificate from the department of education. A preparation program may provide training for mentor teachers, and a mentor teacher who completes the training and at least one year as a mentor teacher may apply to the department of education for a mentor teacher license endorsement. For a school year in which a mentor teacher mentors a teacher candidate, the preparation program and the local education provider must jointly provide a stipend to the mentor teacher of at least $2,000. A mentor teacher may count service as a mentor teacher as professional development for purposes of renewing the teacher's license and master certificate. The bill provides that, during the year of classroom residency, the preparation program in which a teacher candidate is enrolled must pay the teacher candidate a stipend of at least $15,000. The bill creates the classroom residency design grant program (grant program) to provide grants to preparation programs and local education providers that together design a classroom residency program. The preparation program and local education provider must also work with an established teacher residency program in designing the new classroom residency program. The department administers the grant program, and the Colorado commission on higher education (commission) awards the grants. The bill requires the department to prepare an annual report concerning the opportunities for clinical practice, induction program support, and other professional development provided by preparation programs. The department must submit the report to the commission, the department of education, the state board of education, and the education committees of the general assembly. The department must also post the report on its website. The bill relocates with nonsubstantive changes the existing collaborative educator preparation grant program and the Rural Colorado Grow Your Own Educator Act, which provides grants for teaching fellowship programs. The bill directs the department of education to collaborate with the department of higher education to create a mentor teacher endorsement for teachers who hold master certificates and provide mentoring and oversight for teacher candidates.

Senate Bill 195 - Child and Youth Behavioral Health System Enhancements. Sponsored by Senators R. Fields and R. Gardner and Representatives T. Kraft-Tharp, L. Landgraf, and M. Froelich. The bill creates the office of children and youth behavioral health policy coordination (office) in the office of the governor. The bill also creates the children and youth behavioral healthy policy coordination commission (commission) and the children and youth behavioral health advisory council (council) in the office. The commission consists of 15 members, which must be appointed no later than September 1, 2019. The primary duties and responsibilities of the commission include:

  • Providing leadership to increase and enhance efficient and effective behavioral health services to children and youth;
  • Coordinating efforts between state agencies and departments to increase public understanding and awareness of child and youth behavioral health needs;
  • Recommending shared policies to remove administrative barriers in order to facilitate collaboration between communities, state departments, and political subdivisions of the state;
  • Monitoring and receiving updates related to network adequacy for access to behavioral health services in the state;
  • Compiling and disseminating information regarding best practices for delivering and funding behavioral health services;
  • Receiving and acting on recommendations;
  • Recommending funds contained in each department's budget that can be identified for collaborative service delivery systems; and
  • Beginning January 1, 2020, and each January 1 thereafter, recommending performance measures for each department office and county represented on the commission that will quantify and demonstrate the effectiveness of the behavioral health system in Colorado.

The commission shall consult and collaborate with other organizations that incorporate child behavioral health strategies when developing proposals, activities, and implementation planning. Beginning October 1, 2019, the commission shall work collaboratively with the department of health care policy and financing and the department of human services (departments) to implement the wraparound services for children and youth at risk of out-of-home placement. No later than July 1, 2020, the commission shall:

  • Recommend to the departments programmatic utilization of a single standardized assessment tool to facilitate identification of behavioral health issues and other needs;
  • Recommend to the departments developmentally appropriate and culturally competent statewide behavioral health standardized screening tools for primary care providers serving children, youth, and caregivers in the perinatal period;
  • Design and recommend a child and youth behavioral health delivery system pilot program that addresses the challenges of fragmentation and duplication of behavioral health services.

The council consists of 25 members, who must be appointed no later than September 1, 2019. The primary duties, responsibilities, and functions of the council include:

  • Assisting the commission in fulfilling its duties;
  • Reviewing the commission's data on performance measures and providing input to the commission to ensure continuous quality improvement;
  • Identifying, monitoring, soliciting input, and providing policy and budgetary recommendations on emerging children and youth behavioral health issues affecting the quality and availability of behavioral health services reported by local collaborative management programs; and
  • Submitting any formal recommendations to the commission.

On or before July 1, 2020, and each July 1 thereafter, the governor shall ensure than an annual external evaluation fo the commission and council is conducted by an independent organization, which evaluation must be made publicly available in an electronic format. On or before July 1, 2020, and every July 1 thereafter, the commission shall submit an annual report to the governor and the health and human services committee of the senate and the public health care and human services committee of the house of representatives (committees). On or before January 5, 2021, and annually thereafter, the commission shall present the annual report and submit a progress report on any recommendations to the committees. The commission and council are scheduled to repeal on September 1, 2024, after review by the department of regulatory agencies.

Senate Bill 199 - READ Act Implementation Measures. Sponsored by Senators N. Todd and B. Rankin and Representatives J. Wilson and J. McCluskie. The bill makes several changes concerning implementation of the Colorado Reading to Ensure Academic Development Act (READ act) by school districts, charter schools, and boards of cooperative services that operate schools (local education providers) as follows:

  • Requiring that instructional programming and services for teaching reading be focused on the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, reading fluency including oral skills, and reading comprehension (foundational reading skills);
  • Directing each local education provider to adopt a reading education program plan for each of the schools operated by the local education provider, specifying the minimum contents of each plan, directing the local education provider to report to the department of education (department), and directing the department to monitor implementation of the plan;
  • Specifying that students with significant reading deficiencies (SRD) and students who read below grade level must receive a specified minimum amount of educator-assisted reading time each day;
  • Requiring each local education provider to annually post online for public access information concerning the percentage of students who are identified as having SRD, the percentage of students who are not identified as having SRD but are reading below grade level, and the amount and use of money that the local education provider receives as per-pupil intervention money and through the early literacy grant program.

The bill directs the department to develop and implement a public information campaign to emphasize the importance of learning to read by third grade and to highlight the local education providers that achieve high percentages of third-grade students who are reading at grade level. The bill directs the department to contract with one or more entities to independently evaluate whether a local education provider's use of per-pupil intervention money or early literacy grant program money results in students making measurable progress toward reading competency. The bill changes the distribution of money appropriated from the early literacy fund by reducing the amount distributed as per-pupil intervention money, increasing the amount distributed  through the early literacy grant fund, and adding distributions to pay for the public information campaign and the reading certification program. The bill changes the procedure for distributing the per-pupil intervention money by:

  • Requiring a local education provider to provide information and meet certain requirements in order to receive the money;
  • Authorizing the department to monitor and, if necessary, audit the use of the money throughout the budget year;
  • Expanding the allowable uses of the per-pupil intervention money to include purchasing core reading instructional programs and purchasing technology, including software, to assist in assessing and monitoring student progress; and
  • Capping the amount of per-pupil intervention money that a local education provider may retain from year to year.

The bill amends the early literacy grant program to provide that, if the department, at the completion of a grant, determines that the program implemented with the grant money was successful in moving students toward reading competency, the state board of education must automatically renew the grant and increase the grant amount if necessary to enable the grant recipient to expand the program. The bill requires a local education provider to report the scores attained by students on the interim reading assessments if the local education provider uses per-pupil intervention money to purchase instructional programming in reading. The bill directs the department to create a reading certification program that is focused on the foundational reading skills and must include 3 tiers: Paraprofessional certification; educator certification; and reading coach certification. Each local education provider must obtain reading certifications for their educators at the educator or reading coach level and may obtain reading certifications at the paraprofessional level for other employees and for parents, upper-grade students, and other community members who request training through the local education provider. The reading certifications are free to local education providers and the persons obtaining the certification.

Senate Bill 207 - Fiscal Year 2019–2020 Long Bill. Sponsored by Senator D. Moreno and Representative D. Esgar. The bill concerns the provision for payment of the expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2019, except as otherwise noted.

Senate Bill 216 - High School Innovative Learning Pilot. Sponsored by Senator J. Bridges and Representative S. Bird. The bill creates the high school innovative learning pilot program (pilot program) to support school districts, boards of cooperative services, and charter schools (local education providers) in providing innovative learning opportunities to students enrolled in Grades 9 through 12 (high school students). Each local education provider that is selected to participate in the pilot program is allowed, for purposes of school finance, to count all high school students as full-time pupils regardless of whether they meet the required number of teacher-pupil instruction and contact hours for full-time equivalent. A local education provider may apply to participate in the pilot program by submitting an application that, among other tings, describes the local education provider's innovative learning plan (plan). The bill specifies other requirements for the application and requirements for the plan. The department of education (department) implements the pilot program by reviewing the applications and recommending to the state board of education (state board) the applicants that should participate in the pilot program, and the state board selects the participants. The recommendations and selections must be based on criteria specified in the bill. The bill limits the number of pilot program participants in the first year but states the intent of the general assembly to increase participation to 100% by the 2025-2026 budget year. The bill creates a grant program to award grants to local education providers that do not enroll any part-time high school students. A grant recipient must use the grant money to create and implement a plan and may request assistance from the contracting entity in creating the plan. A grant may be renewed for a total of 3 budget years. The bill directs the department to contract with a statewide nonprofit entity to assist the department and local education providers in applying to participate in the pilot program, participating in the pilot program and the grant program, evaluating the pilot program and grant program, and preparing a report concerning implementation of the pilot program and grant program. The bill specifies information that each participating local education provider must submit to the department concerning its participation in the pilot program or grant program and requires the department to prepare an annual report summarizing the information and evaluating the success of the pilot program and grant program in increasing high school student participation in innovative learning opportunities. The pilot program and the grant program are repealed July 1, 2025.

Senate Bill 246 - Public School Finance. Sponsored by Senators N. Todd and P. Lundeen and Representatives J. Wilson and B. McLachlan. Section 1 of the bill increases the statewide base per-pupil funding for the 2019-2020 budget year by $182.76 to account for inflation, for a new statewide base per-pupil funding of $6,951.53. Section 2 sets the minimum district total program funding for the 2019-2020 budget year. The district total program funding reflects a $102 million reduction in the dollar amount of the budget stabilization factor over the prior budget year. Section 3 amends the professional development and students support program (program)  for English language learners and educators who work with English language learners to distribute money appropriated for the program's services and educator professional development activities proportionately, based on the level of English language proficiency of the students served by the program. Section 4, for the 2019-2020 budget year, distributes $25 million on a per-pupil basis to large rural school districts and small rural school districts, including district charter schools and each institute charter school whose accounting district is a large or small rural school district. Large rural school districts share 55% of the appropriation, and small rural school districts share 45% of the appropriation. The bill bases the distribution on a school district's funded pupil count for the 2018-2019 budget year. The bill specifies intended uses of the money. Section 5 distributes $5 million to school districts, including charter schools and the state charter school institute schools, to address behavioral health issues in schools. Each school district and the state charter school institute receive an initial allocation of $20,000. The remaining appropriation is then distributed on a per-pupil basis to the school district and state charter school institute based on the school district's total funded pupil count for the 2018-2019 budget year and the total student enrollment in institute charter schools for the 2018-2019 budget year.

 

 

Enacted House Legislation

House Bill 1002 - Leadership Professional Development for School Principals. Sponsored by Representatives J. Wilson and B. McLachlan and Senators K. Priola and R. Zenzinger. The bill creates the school leadership pilot program program) to provide professional development for public elementary, middle, and high school principals. During the 2019-20 budget year, the department of education (department) is directed to design and implement the program or contract with a nonprofit entity to design and implement the program. The program must include identification of high-quality school principals who will interact with the school principals selected to receive professional development through the program. The program must also include professional development in distributive and collaborative leadership skills with the goal of improving educator retention, school climate and culture, and student outcomes. School principals may apply to receive professional development through the program during the 2020-21 and 2021-22 budget years. The department or the contracted entity must review the applications and recommend participants to the state board of education (state board), who shall select the participants. Subject to available appropriations, the state board must provide grants to the employing entities of the school principals who participate in the program either as high-quality school principals or to receive professional development. The grants are paid from money appropriated to the school leadership pilot program fund created in the bill. By March 15, 2020, the department must report to the education committees of the general assembly concerning the design of the program. By January 15, 2022, the department must report to the education committees concerning implementation of the program, including recommendations for whether the program should be continued. The program is repealed, effective July 1, 2022.

House Bill 1005 - Income Tax Credit for Early Childhood Educators. Sponsored by Representatives J. Buckner and J. Wilson and Senators N. Todd and K. Priola. The bill provides an income tax credit to eligible early childhood educators who hold an early childhood professional credential and who, for at least 6 months of the taxable year, are either the head of a family child care home or are employed with an eligible early childhood education program or a family child care home. The bill specifies that an early childhood education program must have achieved at least a level 2 quality rating under the Colorado shines quality rating and improvement system and either has fiscal agreements with the Colorado child care assistance program or is a program that meets the federal early head start or head start standards. The amount of the credit is dependent on the eligible early childhood educator's credentialing level and is annually adjusted for inflation.

House Bill 1008 - Include Career and Technical Education in BEST Program. Sponsored by Representatives K. Kraft-Tharp and D. Larson and Senators N. Todd and P. Lundeen. The bill amends the Building Excellent Schools Today Act to allow the public school capital construction assistance board (board) to provide grants to support career and technical education capital construction, which is defined as:

  • New construction or retrofitting of public school facilities for certain career and technical education programs; and
  • Equipment necessary for individual student learning and classroom instruction, including  equipment that provides access to instructional materials or that is necessary for professional use by a classroom teacher.

The bill requires the board to report annually to the capital development committee and to the education and finance committees of the house of  representatives and the senate, or to any successor committees, concerning the issuance and denial of career and technical education capital construction grants during the preceding year.

House Bill 1017 - Kindergarten Through Fifth Grade Social and Emotional Health Act. Sponsored by Representative D. Michaelson-Jenet and Senator R. Fields. The bill creates the Colorado K-5 Social and Emotional Health Act (act). The act requires the department of education (department) to select a pilot school district (pilot district) to participate in a pilot program that ensures that a school social worker, as defined in the act, is dedicated to each of grades kindergarten through fifth grade. To the extent possible, the school social worker shall follow the same students through each grade. The general assembly shall appropriate the resources necessary for the pilot district to hire or contract with the additional school social workers. The department shall select a pilot district that meets the characteristics outlined in the bill, including high poverty, ethnic diversity, and a large concentration of students in the foster care system. Among other responsibilities consistent with the school social worker license, the school social worker shall provide needed services to students and their families in the pilot district, including identifying learning disabilities, conducting functional behavior assessments and developing behavior intervention plans, identifying food insecurities, and helping eligible students and their families access public benefits. Services must be provided at school and during school hours, as appropriate. The pilot program begins operation during the 2020-21 school year and repeals in July 2027. The department shall contract with a professional program evaluator (evaluator) to conduct a preliminary evaluation in 2024 and a final evaluation before  the repeal of the pilot program. The evaluator shall establish the method for the pilot district's data collection and monitor data throughout the pilot program. The evaluator shall evaluate the effectiveness of services provided by the pilot program on the academic, mental, and physical health and well-being of the student cohorts within the scope of the pilot program. The bill requires the department to request money for pilot program administration, employment contracts for social  workers, and the pilot program evaluation through the annual budget process. 

House Bill 1024 - Colorado Youth Advisory Council Review Committee. Sponsored by Representatives H. McKean and B. Buentello and Senators N. Todd and D. Coram. The Colorado youth advisory council (council) is comprised of 4 legislative members and 40 nonlegislative members who are between 14 and 19 years of age. The council meets 4 times each year to examine, evaluate, and discuss the issues, interests, and needs affecting Colorado youth. On or before April 30 each year, the council reports to legislative committees a summary of the council's work and recommendations. The bill creates the Colorado youth advisory council review committee (review committee). The review committee is comprised of the legislative members of the council, 5 nonlegislative council members who are appointed by the council, and one member of the legislative council. The 5 legislative members of the review committee serve as voting members. All other members are nonvoting members. The review committee may meet up to 3 times each interim and recommend up to 3 bills to the legislative council.

House Bill 1025 - Limits on Job Application Criminal History Inquiries. Sponsored by Representatives J. Melton and L. Herod and Senators M. Foote and R. Rodriguez. The bill prohibits employers from:

  • Advertising that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position;
  • Placing a statement in an employment application that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position; or
  • Inquiring about an applicant's criminal history on an initial application.

An employer may obtain a job applicant's criminal history at any time. An employer is exempt from the restrictions on advertising and initial employment applications when:

  • The law prohibits a person who has a particular criminal history from being employed in a particular job;
  • The employer is participating in a program to encourage employment of people with criminal histories; or
  • The employer is required by law to conduct a criminal history record check for the particular position.

The department of labor and employment is charged with enforcing the requirements of the bill and may issue warnings and orders of compliance for violations and, for second or subsequent violations, impose civil penalties. A violation of the restrictions does not create a private cause of action, and the bill does not create a protected class under employment anti-discrimination laws. The department is directed to adopt rules regarding procedures for handling complaints against employers.

House Bill 1030 - Unlawful Electronic Sexual Communication. Sponsored by Representatives M. Soper and D. Roberts and Senators B. Rankin and R. Zenzinger. The bill creates the crime of unlawful electronic sexual communication. The bill prohibits a person who is in a position of trust with respect to a child from communicating with that child through electronic means and describing explicit sexual conduct in the communication.

House Bill 1031 - Child Patient More Than One Primary Caregiver. Sponsored by Representative M. Gray and Senator J. Gonzales. Under current law, a medical marijuana patient is limited to having one primary caregiver at a time. The bill makes an exception for a patient who is under 18 years of age and allows each parent or guardian to serve as a primary caregiver.

House Bill 1032 - Comprehensive Human Sexuality Education. Sponsored by Representatives S. Lontine and Y. Caraveo and Senators N. Todd and D. Coram. The bill moves provisions of the statutory legislative declaration to a nonstatutory legislative declaration. The bill clarifies content requirements for public schools that offer comprehensive human sexuality education and prohibits instruction from explicitly or implicitly teaching or endorsing religious ideology or sectarian tenets or doctrines, using shame-based or stigmatizing language or instructional tools, employing gender norms or gender stereotypes, or excluding the relational or sexual experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender individuals. Current law provides for a comprehensive human sexuality education grant program. The bill amends certain provisions of the grant program to:

  • Require the department of public health and environment to submit an annual report concerning the outcomes of the grant program indefinitely;
  • Add 8 representatives to the oversight entity and require membership of the oversight entity to be comprised of at least 7 members who are members of groups of people who have been or might be discriminated against;
  • Require grant applicants to demonstrate a need for money to implement comprehensive human sexuality education; and
  • Require that rural public schools or public schools that do not currently offer comprehensive human sexuality education receive priority when selecting grant applicants.

The bill provides a general appropriation of at least $1 million annually for the grant program. The bill prohibits the state board of education from waiving the content requirements for any public school that provides comprehensive human sexuality education.

House Bill 1033 - Local Governments May Regulate Nicotine Products. Sponsored by Representatives C. Kennedy and K. Tipper and Senators K. Priola and R. Fields. Sections 1 through 3 of the bill authorize a county to enact a resolution or ordinance that prohibits a minor from possessing or purchasing cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products. Sections 1 and 2 also authorize a county to impose regulations on cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products that are more stringent than statewide regulations, including prohibiting sales to a person under 21 years of age, and section 3 expressly authorizes a county to enact a resolution or ordinance regulating the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products. From state income tax money, the state currently apportions an amount equal to 27% of state cigarette tax revenues to cities, towns, and counties in proportion to the amount of state sales tax revenues collected within their boundaries. In order to receive their allocation of this money, cities, towns, and counties are prohibited from imposing their own fees, licenses, or taxes on cigarette sales or from attempting to impose a tax on cigarettes. Section 4 removes this prohibition, thus allowing cities, towns, and counties to impose fees, licenses, or taxes on cigarette sales without losing their apportioned state cigarette tax revenues. Section 5 authorizes a county, if approved by a vote of the people within the county, to impose a special sales tax on the sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products and provides a mechanism by which a county's special sales tax applies to a municipality within the boundary of the county unless the municipality, if approved by a vote of the people within the municipality, enacts its own such special sales tax; however, the county and municipality may then enter into an intergovernmental agreement authorizing the county to continue to levy, collect, and enforce its special sales tax within the corporate limits of the municipality.

House Bill 1036 - Annual Stipends for Certified School Professionals. Sponsored by Representatives J. Arndt and B. McLachlan and Senator N. Todd. The bill adds nationally certified school psychologists as school professionals eligible for annual stipends awarded by the department of education (department) if the school psychologist meets the requirements set forth in the bill. The bill clarifies that school counselors are school professionals who have been eligible for annual stipends awarded by the department pursuant to the same requirements for teachers and principals. The bill corrects the name of the national board for professional teaching standards by removing the word principal from the title.

House Bill 1039 - Identity Documents for Transgender Persons. Sponsored by Representative D. Esgar and Senator D. Moreno. Under current law, a person born in Colorado who seeks a new birth certificate from the registrar of vital statistics (state registrar) to reflect a change in gender designation must obtain a court order indicating that the sex of the person has been changed by surgical procedure and ordering that the gender designation on the birth certificate be amended, and the person must obtain a court order with a legal name change. The bill repeals that provision and creates new requirements for the issuance of birth certificates in cases of changes to gender designation or for an intersex individual. The bill requires that the state registrar issue a new birth certificate rather than an amended birth certificate. The bill allows a person who has previously obtained an amended birth certificate under previous versions of the law to apply to receive a new birth certificate. A person is not required to obtain a court order for a legal name change in order to obtain a new birth certificate with a change in gender designation. The bill gives the courts in this state jurisdiction to issue a decree to amend a birth certificate to reflect a change in gender designation for persons born in another state or foreign jurisdiction if the law of such other state or foreign jurisdiction requires a court decree in order to amend a birth certificate to reflect a change in gender designation. The bill exempts transgender persons from having to submit a public notice of name change. 

House Bill 1042 - Extend Court Jurisdiction for Vulnerable Youth. Sponsored by Representative S. Gonzales-Gutierrez and Senator J. Gonzales. The bill extends the jurisdiction of the court for guardianship proceedings and proceedings concerning the allocation of parental responsibilities for certain unmarried youth under 21 years of age who meet the requirements for such orders, as well as criteria specified in the bill, and who seek findings from the court that may support an application for special immigrant juvenile classification under federal law.

House Bill 1047 - Metropolitan District Fire Protection Sales Tax. Sponsored by Representative B. Buentello and Senators L. Garcia and J. Danielson. A metropolitan district is a type of special district that provides at least 2 services from a list of specific services. One of the services that a metropolitan district is currently authorized to provide is fire protection. Currently, a metropolitan district is authorized to levy a property tax to provide services; however, the district can also levy a sales tax for safety protection, street improvement, and transportation purposes. Both property taxes and sales taxes require voter approval. The bill allows a metropolitan district to also levy a sales tax to provide fire protection in the areas of the district in which the sales tax is levied.

House Bill 1052 - Early Childhood Development Special District. Sponsored by Representatives J. McCluskie and J. Rich and Senator J. Bridges. The bill authorizes the creation of early childhood development service districts (districts) to provide services for children from birth through 8 years of age. Early childhood development services are defined to include early care and education, health, mental health, and developmental services, including prevention and intervention. Districts are authorized to seek voter approval to levy property taxes and sales taxes in the district to generate revenues to provide early childhood development services. The district must be organized pursuant to the Special District Act as modified by the bill. Under the bill, all eligible electors in the proposed district, rather than only property owners, are able to vote on the organization of the district and related ballot issues. The service plan for a proposed district is not required to be submitted to the planning commission for each county in which the special district is proposed to be located, and instead is submitted directly to the board of county commissioners (board) for such counties. In addition, the bill directs that the board shall not accept or act upon the request of a person owning property in the proposed service area to have his or her property excluded from the special district. The court conducting a hearing for the petition is also directed to not accept or act upon such a petition to exclude property from the district. The districts are governed by the Special District Act; except that they are not subject to provisions concerning the inclusion or exclusion of property, procedures for th levy and collection of taxes, the certification and notice of special district taxes for general obligation indebtedness, property tax reduction agreements, and public improvement contracts. A district is authorized to contract with another district or other provider for early childhood development services to provide services throughout the district.

House Bill 1055 - Public School Cap Construction Financial Assistance. Sponsored by Representative S. Bird and Senators D. Coram and R. Zenzinger. Current law requires the greater of the firs t$40 million of state retail marijuana excise tax revenue or 90% of the revenue to be credited to the public school capital construction assistance fund (assistance fund) and limits the maximum total amount of annual lease payments payable by the state under the terms of all outstanding lease-purchase agreements entered into as authorized by the Building Excellent Schools Today Act (BEST) to $100 million. Beginning on July 1, 2019, the bill:

  • Requires all state retail marijuana excise tax revenue to be credited to the assistance fund;
  • Increases the maximum total amount of BEST annual lease payments to $105 million for state fiscal year 2019-20 and to $110 million for state fiscal year 2020-21 and each state fiscal year thereafter;
  • Changes the percentage of the state retail marijuana excise tax revenue credited to the assistance fund that is further credited to the charter school facilities assistance account of the assistance fund for distribution to charter schools from 12.5% to a percentage equal to the percentage of students included in the statewide funded pupil count who were enrolled in charter schools for the prior school year; and
  • Changes the total amount of money annually appropriated from the state education fund for charter school capital construction from a flat amount of $20 million per year to $20 million per year annually adjusted for changes in the percentage of students included in the statewide funded pupil count who are enrolled in charter schools.

House Bill 1059 - Remove Redundant Language in Educator Licensing. Sponsored by Representative J. Arndt and Senator J. Tate.The bill removes amendments House Bill 18-1095 made to the educator licensing statute regarding the number of years a military spouse licensed in another state must teach continuously or have continuous experience in order to apply for a professional teacher license or professional services license in Colorado. House bill 18-1130 amended statute to apply the same standards to all out-of-state applicants as apply to military spouses. The bill removes the redundant and possibly confusing reference to military spouses in the professional teacher license statute and the professional services license statute.

House Bill 1066 - Counting Special Education in Graduation Rates. Sponsored by Representatives B. Buentello and C. Kipp and Senator M. Foote. The bill clarifies that a student who is enrolled in special education services must be counted in enrolling public high school's, school district's or institute's, and state's graduation rate in the year in which the student completes high school graduation requirements.

House Bill 1086 - Plumbing Inspections Ensure Compliance. Sponsored by Representative M. Duran and Senator B. Pettersen. Current law requires plumbing inspectors employed by qualified state institutions of higher education to possess the same qualifications required by the state of plumbing inspectors. Section 1 of the bill requires the same inspectors employed by an incorporated town or city, county, or city and county. Section 2 requires state plumbing inspectors or plumbing inspectors employed by the state, an incorporated town or city, county, city and county, or qualified state institution of higher education (entity) to conduct a contemporaneous review of each plumbing project inspected to ensure compliance with the plumbing law, including specifically licensure and apprentice requirements. However, each entity need not perform a contemporaneous review for each inspection of a project. Each entity shall develop standard procedures to advise inspectors on how to conduct a contemporaneous review. Each entity must post its standard procedures on its public website and provide the director of the division of professions and occupations within the department of regulatory agencies with a link to the web page on which the standard procedures have been posted.

House Bill 1087 - Local Public Meeting Notices Posted on Website. Sponsored by Representatives C. Hansen and M. Soper and Senators J. Bridges and R. Woodward. The bill requires local government to post notices of public meetings required by the state open meetings law on the local government's website. The notices are accessible to the public at no charge. The notices shall be searchable, if feasible, by type of meeting, date and time of meeting, and agenda contents.

House Bill 1100 - Prohibit Use Restriction on School District Property. Sponsored by Representative T. Geitner and Senators P. Lundeen and J. Bridges. A board of education of a school district (board of education) is currently authorized by law, upon the terms and conditions approved by the board of education. A board of education is also authorized to rent or lease district property for a specified term. The bill prohibits a board of education from including a use restriction on the sale, conveyance, lease, or rental of any district property that restricts the property from being used as a public or nonpublic school for any grade from preschool through 12th grade.

House Bill 1104 - Rights of Persons Office Respondent Parent' Counsel. Sponsored by Representative K. Ransom and Senator P. Lee. The bill adds to the list of agencies and attorneys authorized to have statewide read-only access to the name index and register of actions for the judiciary department those attorneys who are either under contract with or authorized by the office of the respondent parents' counsel. The bill clarifies that a parent whose rights in a parent-child relationship have been terminated and who has filed a petition to reinstate the rights of a parent-child relationship is entitled to appointed counsel through the office of respondent parents' counsel, if income eligibility criteria are satisfied.

House Bill 1110 - Media Literacy. Sponsored by Representative L. Cutter and Senator B. Pettersen. The bill creates the media literacy advisory committee (committee) within the department of education (department). The committee is responsible for studying media literacy and creating a report for the education committees of the house of representatives and the senate regarding the committee's findings and recommendations for implementing media literacy in elementary and secondary education. The bill requires the department to implement media literacy in elementary and secondary education standards based upon the committee's report.

House Bill 1120 - Youth Mental Health Education and Suicide Prevention. Sponsored by Representatives D. Michaelson-Jenet and D. Roberts and Senators D. Coram and S. Fenberg. The bill allows a minor 12 years of age or older to seek and obtain psychotherapy services with or without the consent of the minor's parent or guardian. A registered psychotherapist or licensed social worker providing psychotherapy services to a minor may, with the consent of the minor, advise the minor's parent or legal guardian of the psychotherapy services provided. The bill requires the department of education, in consultation with the office of suicide prevention (office), the youth advisory council, and the suicide prevention commission, to create and maintain a mental health education literacy resource bank. The resource bank is available to the public free of charge. The bill requires the state board of education to adopt standards related to mental health, including suicide prevention.

House Bill 1133 - Colorado Child Abuse Response and Evaluation Network. Sponsored by Representatives Y. Caraveo and R. Pelton and Senator R. Fields. The bill establishes the Colorado child abuse response and evaluation network (CARENetwork) to improve the provision of services to children who are subject to physical or sexual abuse or neglect. The department of public health and environment is to contract with a nonprofit organization to act as a resource center. The bill specifies duties of the resource center. The bill also establishes a CARENetwork advisory committee and specifies the membership and duties of the advisory committee.

House Bill 1134 - Identification and Interventions for Students with Dyslexia. Sponsored by Representatives J. Buckner and J. Wilson and Senator N. Todd. The bill directs the commissioner of education (commissioner) to convene a working group to analyze state and national data and practices concerning identification and support of students with dyslexia and to recommend dyslexia screening tools and processes, a statewide plan for identifying and supporting students with dyslexia, and educator training in recognizing and providing interventions for students with dyslexia. The working group must submit a report of its recommendations to the commissioner, and the commissioner must submit the report to the state board of education and the education committees of the general assembly. The bill directs the department of education (department) to establish a pilot program to assist school districts, boards of cooperative services, and charter schools local education providers) in using READ act assessments to screen for dyslexia and in providing interventions for students who are identified as having dyslexia. At the completion of the pilot program, the department must evaluate the  effectiveness of the screening and interventions, refine the resources used, and disseminate the resources used to all local education providers in the state. The department must also provide technical assistance in implementing the resources at the request of a local education provider. The bill directs the commissioner to provide a dyslexia specialist to support the working group and the pilot program and to develop training materials related to dyslexia.

House Bill 1137 - Expand Teacher Cadet Program Include ECE. Sponsored by Representatives J. Wilson and D. Valdez and Senator K. Priola. The bill clarifies that high school students who are interested in early childhood education may participate in the teacher cadet program.

House Bill 1149 - Age of Delinquency Study. Sponsored by Representative S. Gonzales-Gutierrez and Senator P. Lee. The bill directs the age of delinquency task force of the Colorado commission on criminal and juvenile justice to study using juvenile justice services and systems for adults 18 through 20 years of age (emerging adults). The task force shall:

  • Compile data regarding all criminal filings in the state from the last 3 years that data is available in which a defendant is 18 through 20 years of age;
  • Study the established brain research for emerging adults, study the data collected, study the potential impacts on the division of youth services and youthful offender system if they also served emerging adults, and make recommendations to the general assembly regarding appropriate uses of the juvenile justice system for emerging adults; and
  • Create a report of the collected data and recommendations for the judiciary committees of the House of Representatives and Senate by March 31, 2020.

House Bill 1171 - Expand Child Nutrition School Lunch Protection Act. Sponsored by Representative D. Michaelson-Jenet and Senators R. Fields and K. Priola. Current law specifies an annual appropriation for the child nutrition school lunch protection program (program) to provide lunches at no charge to children in state-subsidized early childhood education programs administered by public schools or in kindergarten through fifth grade who would otherwise have to pay for a reduced-price lunch. Current law also authorizes an annual appropriation to provide lunches at no charge to students in sixth through eighth grades in schools that elect to participate in the expanded program. The bill requires the general assembly to make an appropriation for the program but removes the specified amounts, clarifies that all students in sixth through eighth grade participating in the federal reduced price school lunch program are eligible for the program, and extends the grades of eligibility for the program to students through the twelfth grade.

House Bill 1175 - Property Tax Valuation Appeal Process. Sponsored by Representative M. Gray and Senator J. Gonzales. For counties that have elected to use the alternate protest and appeal procedures, section 1 of the bill requires:

  • A taxpayer who owns rent-producing commercial real property to provide the assessor with property rental information (rental information) on or before July 15 of the year of the appeal; and
  • The county assessor to mail the notice of determination regarding the appeal by August 15 of the year of the appeal instead of the last working day in August.

For all counties, section 2 modifies:

  • The rental information that a petitioner appealing the valuation of rent-producing commercial property or the denial of an abatement must provide to a county; and 
  • The information related to a county's determination of the value that a county is required to provide to a petitioner who has filed an appeal with the board of assessment appeals. 

A petitioner who provides rental information to an assessor as part of an alternate protest and appeal is not required to provide the same information in an appeal of the valuation.

House Bill 1186 - School Employment Background Check Certification. Sponsored by Representatives T. Exum Sr. and B. McLachlan and Senators J. Cooke and J. Bridges. The bill clarifies issues concerning fingerprinting options for background checks for school employees.

House Bill 1187 - Increase Student Aid Application Completion Rates. Sponsored by Representative J. Coleman and Senator J. Bridges. The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate $250,000 each year for the 2020-21, 2021-22, and 2022-23 fiscal years from the general fund to the state board of education. The state board of education shall distribute the appropriation to education providers that receive a grant under the school counselor corps grant program, for the purpose of educating and supporting students and families with the completion and submission of the free application for federal student aid or applications for state student aid.

House Bill 1192 - Inclusion of American Minorities in Teaching Civil Government. Sponsored by Representatives B. Buentello and S. Gonzales-Gutierrez and Senator J. Gonzales. The bill mandates funding instruction in public schools of history and civil government of the United States and Colorado, including but not limited to the history, culture, and social contributions of American Indians, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and the intersectionality of significant social and cultural features within these communities. Current law requires school districts to convene community forums to discuss the content standards in history and civil government at least once every 10 years. The bill requires the forums to be held at least every 6 years. The history, culture, social contributions, and civil government in education commission is established to make recommendations to the state board of education when the state board performs its scheduled 6-year review of education standards so that those standards and programs accurately reflect the history, culture, social contributions, and civil government of the United States and Colorado, including the contributions and influence of American Indians, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and the intersectionality of significant social and cultural features within these communities.

House Bill 1194 - School Discipline for Preschool Through Second Grade. Sponsored by Representatives S. Lontine and C. Larson and Senators K. Priola and R. Fields. The bill allows a state-funded, community-based preschool program, school district, or charter school (enrolling entity) to impose an out-of-school suspension or expel a student enrolled in preschool, kindergarten, or first or second grade only under specified circumstances. If the enrolling entity imposes an out-of-school suspension, the length of the suspension must be limited to the time required to resolve the safety threat, but no more than 3 school days. The state board of education (state board) cannot waive the provisions concerning suspension and expulsionof young students for school districts or charter schools. Each school district and charter school must ensure that its school discipline code reflects the requirements specified in the bill. The state board must annually review the data concerning suspensions and expulsions of students in preschool, kindergarten, and first and second grade.

House Bill 1201 - Board of Education Executive Session Negotiations Strategy. Sponsored by Representatives C. Kipp and J. Wilson and Senators D. Coram and T. Story. The bill concerns the ability of a board of education of a school district to meet in executive session to discuss the district's strategy in conducting negotiations related to certain employment-related agreements.

House Bill 1203 - School Nurse Grant Program. Sponsored by Representative K. Mullica and Senator N. Todd. The bill creates a grant program to increase the number of school nurses.

House Bill 1210 - Local Government Minimum Wage. Sponsored by Representatives J. Melton and R. Galindo and Senators J. Danielson and D. Moreno. The bill allows a unit of local government to enact laws establishing a minimum wage within its jurisdiction.

House Bill 1239 - Census Outreach Grant Program. Sponsored by Representatives K. Tipper and Y. Caraveo and Senators K. Priola and F. Winter. In the division of local government (division) the bill creates the 2020 census outreach grant program (grant program) in the department of local affairs (department) to provide grants to local governments, intergovernmental agencies, councils of government, housing authorities, school districts, and nonprofit organizations (eligible recipients) to support the accurate counting of the population of the state for the 2020 census. The department, in coordination with the grant program committee (committee), which is also created in the division, is required to implement and administer the grant program and to develop policies and procedures necessary for such implementation and administration. The committee is created in the division to make recommendations to the department regarding the policies and procedures to review grant applications and to make recommendations to the department regarding which applications to approve for the grant award. The committee consists of 7 members, 3 of whom are appointed by the governor and 4 of whom are appointed, one each, by the speaker of the house of representatives, the president of the senate, and the minority leaders of the house of representatives and the senate. The bill specifies that eligible recipients may use grant money to conduct 2020 census outreach, promotion, and education to focus on hard-to-count communities in the state and to increase the self-response rate and accuracy of the 2020 census. Eligible recipients may also use grant money to further award grants to other local governments, intergovernmental agencies, councils of government, housing authorities, school districts, or nonprofit organizations. To receive a grant, an eligible recipient must submit an application to the department in accordance with the policies and procedures developed by the department. The bill specifies the information that an application must include at a minimum. The committee is required to review the applications received and to make recommendations to the department regarding which grant applications to approve. In developing its recommendations, the committee is required to consider whether the eligible recipient will be conducting outreach in hard-to-count communities and the size and geographic and demographic diversity of the hard-to-count communities in which outreach, education, and promotion of the 2020 census will occur as provided by all eligible recipients that receive grant money. Subject to available appropriations and in accordance with the recommendation of the committee, the department is required to award grants for the purposes of the grant program on or before November 1, 2019, and to distribute the grant money to eligible recipients that were awarded grants within 30 days after the grants are awarded. Each eligible recipient that received a grant through the grant program is required to submit a report to the department including information to be determined by the department. The department is required to submit a report to the local government committees of the senate and the house of representatives, or any successor committees, and to the governor regarding the census outreach conducted through the grant program. For the 2019-20 fiscal year, the bill directs the general assembly to appropriate $12 million to the department to award grants to eligible recipients for the purposes of the grant program. In addition, the department may solicit, accept, and expend gifts, grants, or donations from private or public sources for the purposes of the grant program. On or before May 1, 2026, and on or before May 1 every 10 years thereafter, the department and the office of the governor are required to develop a strategic action plan, including a discussion of necessary funding for the plan, for outreach and promotion for a successful count of the population in Colorado during the upcoming decennial census.

House Bill 1262 - State Funding for Full-Day Kindergarten. Sponsored by Representatives J. Wilson and B. McLachlan and Senators J. Bridges and R. Fields. Under existing law, the school finance formula provides funding for half-day kindergarten educational programs plus a small additional amount of supplemental kindergarten funding. The bill provides funding through the school finance formula for full-day kindergarten educational programs. A student enrolled in a full-day kindergarten educational program will be funded at the same amount as students enrolled full-time in other grades. A student enrolled in a half-day kindergarten educational program will be funded as a half-day student plus the existing amount of supplemental kindergarten funding. Under existing law, many school districts charge parents of students enrolled in full-day kindergarten a fee to fund the full-day kindergarten educational program. After passage of the bill, a school district or a charter school that provides a full-day kindergarten educational program shall not charge fees for attending kindergarten other than those fees that are routinely charged to parents of students enrolled in other grades and are applicable to the kindergarten educational program. However, if the general assembly stops funding kindergarten students as full-time pupils, then a school district or charter school may resume charging a fee or tuition for the unfunded portion of the school day. Under existing law, a school district may use a half-day preschool position to enroll a child in full-day kindergarten. The bill prohibits using a preschool position to enroll a child in full-day kindergarten. A school district that used preschool positions in this manner in the 2018-19 budget year will retain the positions in the 2019-20 budget year and budget years thereafter to the extent the school district fills the positions with preschool students. The bill directs a school district that is not offering a full-day kindergarten educational program as of the 2019-20 school year to submit a plan to the department of education addressing how it could phase in a full-day kindergarten educational program, but a school district is not required to offer a full-day kindergarten educational program. If a charter school seeks to expand an existing half-day kindergarten educational program to full day, it must notify the charter authorizer and amend the charter contract, if necessary. If the authorizer objects to the program expansion, the charter school and the authorizer must negotiate a change to the charter contract. If the parties cannot agree, the charter school may appeal the issue to the state board of education for a determination. Any renegotiation of the charter school's contract must be limited to the issue of expanding the kindergarten educational program.

House Bill 1267 - Penalties for Failure to Pay Wages. Sponsored by Representatives J. Singer and M. Froelich and Senators J. Danielson and R. Rodriguez. Under existing law, an employer who willfully refuses to pay a wage claim, or falsely denies the amount of a wage claim, or the validity thereof, or that the same is due, with intent to secure any discount or underpayment of such unpaid wage or with intent to annoy, harass, oppress, hinder, delay, or defraud the person who is owed wages (wage theft), is guilty of a misdemeanor. The bill prohibits wage theft with the intent to coerce a person who is owed wages. The bill defines wage theft as theft, which is a felony when the theft is of an amount greater than $2,000. The bill removes the exemption from criminal penalties for an employer who is unable to pay wages or compensation because of a chapter 7 bankruptcy action or other court action resulting in the employer having limited control over his or her assets. The bill includes in the definition of employee any person who performs work that is an integral part of the employer's business and includes in the definition of employer foreign labor contractors, officers or agents of an employer entity, and any person acting directly or indirectly in the interest of an employer in relation to an employee. Under existing law, an employer who pays an employee a wage less than the minimum wage is guilty of a misdemeanor. Under the bill, a person who willfully pays a wage less than the minimum commits theft, which is a felony when the theft is of an amount greater than $2,000.

House Bill 1308 - Foster Care Prevention Services. Sponsored by Representatives J. Singer and L. Landgraf and Senators D. Moreno and B. Rankin. The bill concerns foster care prevention services and seeks to align current standards with the federal "Family First Preventative Services Act."

House Bill 1323 - Occasional Sales by Charitable Organizations. Sponsored by Representatives L. Herod and K. Van Winkle and Senators P. Lundeen and N. Todd. Under current law, up to $25,000 of the funds raised by a charitable organization through occasional sales are exempt from state sales tax. The bill increases that amount to $45,000. The bill also removes the requirement that occasional sales by charitable organizations take place for no more than 12 days, whether consecutive or not, during any calendar year.

 

Defeated Senate Legislation

Senate Bill 012Use of Electronic Devices While Driving

Senate Bill 022Bonuses for Highly Effective Teachers

Senate Bill 033Automatic Law Waivers for School Districts

Senate Bill 048Protect Students from Harmful Material

Senate Bill 055Reduce State Income Tax Rate

Senate Bill 056 - Veterans Employment Preference by Private Employer

Senate Bill 060Educator Suplies Tax Credit

Senate Bill 072 - Bill of Rights Protected Person Under Guardianship

Senate Bill 074Support for Literacy Enrichment for Young Students

Senate Bill 087Students Subjected to a School Safety Incident

Senate Bill 247Educator Performance Evaluation System

Defeated House Legislation

House Bill 1016Basic Skills Placement Tests for High School

House Bill 1049Concealed Handguns on School Grounds

House Bill 1053Computer Science Courses Offered in Schools

House Bill 1093Higher Education Fixed-Rate Tuition Contracts

House Bill 1097General Fund Reductions

House Bill 1116Hunter Education Courses in Public Schools

House Bill 1123Income Tax Deductions for 529 Account K–12 Expenses

House Bill 1125Mental Health Professional Access to Dismissed Complaint

House Bill 1139American Civics Education

House Bill 1141Preserve Senior/Disabled Veteran Property Tax Exemption

House Bill 1151Special Education Opportunity Scholarships

House Bill 1190Repeal of Mill Levy Equalization Fund

House Bill 124316-Year-Olds Voting School District Elections

House Bill 1249 - Safety and Accountability in School Contracts

House Bill 1251Age of Marriage and Empancipation Procedure

House Bill 1270PERA Board Assess Climate-Related Financial Risks

House Bill 1293 - Government Youth Apprenticeship Program Stipends

House Bill 1317Income Tax Credit and Senior Property Tax Exemption

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